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E. coli Blog

Surveillance & Analysis on E. coli News & Outbreaks

Now 34 with E. coli Linked to Oak Leaf Farm

The State Department of Public Health (DPH) today issued the following update on the E. coli outbreak linked to the Oak Leaf Farm in Lebanon, CT:

DPH is investigating 34 confirmed cases of E. coli O157 infection linked to the farm.  The patients range in age from 10 months to 45 years, with a median age of five years.  The patients include six adults and 28 children 14 years old and under; 18 of the children are age five years or under.  In total, nine patients have been hospitalized with four still in the hospital.  Three of the hospitalized patients have been diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a rare but serious illness that affects the kidneys and blood clotting system.

DPH is aware of three patients who did not visit Oak Leaf Farm but became ill with E. coli after having contact with someone with an E. coli infection who did visit the farm. These people are referred to as secondary cases. DPH continues to monitor for additional reports of secondary cases.

At least 15 with E. coli tied to Oak Leaf Farm

The Connecticut State Department of Public Health (DPH) today issued the following update on the E. coli outbreak linked to the Oak Leaf Farm in Lebanon, CT:

As of 1:00 p.m. today, DPH is investigating 15 confirmed cases of E. coli O157 infection.  The number of cases could increase in the near future as DPH is actively identifying individuals who were not initially reported.

So far, investigators have been able to link 14 of these cases to Oak Leaf Farm.  The patients range in age from 1-44 years old, with a median age of six.  In total, five patients have been hospitalized with three still in the hospital.  Two of the hospitalized patients have been diagnosed with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), as first reported last week.

Yesterday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) dispatched a team to Connecticut to assist in the investigation of this outbreak.  Today, officials from DPH, the Connecticut Department of Agriculture, the Uncas Health District, and the CDC team are at the Oak Leaf Farm conducting an onsite investigation.  The Farm remains voluntarily closed to the public, and the owners are cooperating with the investigation.

The outbreak was first identified on Thursday, March 24th when six of seven individuals sickened with E. coli were confirmed by DPH to have recently visited Oak Leaf Farm and come into contact with goats on the farm.  Two of the seven initial patients had subsequently developed Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), a rare but serious illness that affects the kidneys and blood clotting system. As of today, both of those patients continue to be hospitalized.

Unclear at this point if people should have been reading www.fair-safety.com or www.realrawmilkfacts.com – or both.

Pizza Ranch E. coli Outbreak in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Jersey, South Dakota and Wisconsin

10298684_10152794480259144_870828925358065408_n.0.0Pizza Ranch desserts have been linked to E. coli O157:H7 food poisonings in nine states.

The outbreak started in December, mainly among people who had eaten at the Iowa-based chain’s restaurants.  The CDC reports that 13 people were sickened in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Jersey, South Dakota and Wisconsin . Nine of the people said they recently had eaten at Pizza Ranches.  Two children, in Kansas and Nebraska, suffered kidney failure (hemolytic uremic syndrome – HUS) and had to be hospitalized.

The investigation has focused on a dry dough mix used to make desserts.

Jack & The Green Sprouts in Minnesota and Wisconsin Tied to E. coli Sproutbreak

Sprouts are a known source of foodborne illness. Children, the elderly, pregnant women and persons with weakened immune systems should avoid eating raw sprouts of any kind (including alfalfa, clover, radish and mung bean sprouts). You can reduce your risk of illness by requesting that raw sprouts not be added to your food.

Symptoms of illness caused by E. coli O157 typically include stomach cramps and diarrhea, often with bloody stools, but only a low-grade or no fever. People typically become ill two to five days after exposure, but this period can range from one to eight days. Most people recover in five to 10 days. However, E. coli O157 infections sometimes lead to a serious complication called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which can cause kidney failure and other severe problems, including death. Those most at risk of developing complications from E. coli O157 include children younger than 10, the elderly, and those with weakened immune systems.

Minnesota and Wisconsin state health and agriculture officials are investigating an outbreak of foodborne illness associated with alfalfa sprouts produced by Jack & The Green Sprouts. Retailers and restaurants should not sell or serve alfalfa sprouts produced by Jack & The Green Sprouts, and consumers should not eat them at this time.

Routine disease monitoring by the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) identified seven E. coli O157:NM cases in January and early February; E. coli bacteria from those cases all had the same DNA fingerprint. The ill individuals range in age from 18 to 84 years, and five are female. Four of the cases are residents of the Twin Cities metro area, and three live in greater Minnesota. Two were hospitalized, and both have recovered. Two additional cases of E. coli O157 infection, considered part of this outbreak, were identified by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (WDHS) in Wisconsin residents. Neither case was hospitalized.

Minnesota officials are working with investigators at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), WDHS, and the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (WIDATCP). Jack & The Green Sprouts is located in River Falls, Wis., and distributes alfalfa sprouts to states in the upper Midwest and possibly other states. The seven Minnesota cases and at least one of the Wisconsin cases were exposed to implicated alfalfa sprouts from a variety of locations, including grocery/cooperative stores, restaurants, salad bars and commercial food service.

Chipotle E. coli Outbreaks Sickens 60 in 14 States

The initial, larger STEC O26 outbreak was first detected by public health officials in Washington and Oregon through local foodborne disease surveillance. In late October 2015, officials in those states detected an increase in illness and after interviewing ill people, they determined that illness was likely linked to eating at multiple Chipotle Mexican Grill locations.

A total of 55 people infected with the outbreak strain of STEC O26 were reported from 11 states. The majority of illnesses were reported from Washington and Oregon during October 2015. The number of ill people reported from each state was as follows: California (3), Delaware (1), Illinois (1), Kentucky (1), Maryland (1), Minnesota (2), New York (1), Ohio (3), Oregon (13), Pennsylvania (2), and Washington (27).

Among people for whom information was available, illnesses started on dates ranging from October 19, 2015 to December 1, 2015. Ill people ranged in age from 1 year to 94, with a median age of 21. Fifty-seven percent of ill people were female. Twenty-one (38%) people reported being hospitalized.

In December 2015, a second outbreak of a different, rare strain of STEC O26 was identified. A total of five people infected with this strain of STEC O26 were reported from three states. The number of ill people reported from each state was as follows: Kansas (1), North Dakota (1), and Oklahoma (3).

Among people for whom information was available, illnesses started on dates ranging from November 18, 2015 to November 26, 2015. Ill people ranged in age from 6 years to 25, with a median age of 22. Eighty percent of ill people were female. One (20%) person reported being hospitalized.

The epidemiologic evidence collected during these investigations suggested that a common meal item or ingredient served at Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurants was a likely source of both outbreaks. The investigations did not identify a specific food or ingredient linked to illness in either outbreak.

FSIS Reports Tennessee E.coli Illnesse linked to Ground Beef

Snapp’s Ferry Packing Company, an Afton, Tenn. establishment, is recalling approximately 410 pounds of beef product that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ground beef item was produced on Nov. 20, 2015. The following product is subject to recall:

5-lb. packages of “Ground Beef,” with a packaging date of Nov. 20, 2015.

The product subject to recall bears establishment number “Est. 9085” inside the USDA mark of inspection. The item was distributed to restaurants in the Knoxville, Tenn. area. None of this product was sold at retail.

The problem was discovered on Jan. 19, 2016, when a positive result for E. coli O157:H7 from FSIS testing was traced back to the establishment as a result of an ongoing illness investigation in Tennessee. FSIS is continuing to work with our public health partners at the Tennessee Department of Health and Knox County Health Department on this investigation and will provide updated information as it becomes available.

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2–8 days (3–4 days, on average) after exposure the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5-years old and older adults. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

Oklahoma and Kansas Now Linked to Chipolte E. coli Outbreak

The FDA, CDC, and state and local officials are investigating a second, more recent outbreak of a different, rare DNA fingerprint of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O26 (STEC O26) linked to Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurants.

The CDC reports that five people have been reported with the new variant of STEC O26 from a total of three states: Kansas (1), North Dakota (1), and Oklahoma (3).

The Kansas and North Dakota cases ate at the same restaurant in Kansas. The three separate Oklahoma cases all ate at the same Chipotle restaurant.

As of December 18, 2015, 53 people infected with the previously reported outbreak strain of STEC O26 have been reported from nine states: California (3), Illinois (1), Maryland (1), Minnesota (2), New York (1), Ohio (3), Oregon (13), Pennsylvania (2), and Washington (27).

The epidemiologic evidence available at this time suggests that a common meal item or ingredient served at Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurants in several states is a likely source of both outbreaks.

The investigations are still ongoing to determine what specific food is linked to illness.

Chipotle E. coli Numbers Keep Rising

Fifty-three people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O26 have been reported from nine states. The majority of illnesses have been reported from Washington and Oregon during October 2015. The number of ill people reported from each state is as follows: California (3), Illinois (1), Maryland (1), Minnesota (2), New York (1), Ohio (3), Oregon (13), Pennsylvania (2), and Washington (27). Among people for whom information is available, illnesses started on dates ranging from October 19, 2015 to November 14, 2015. Ill people range in age from 1 year to 94, with a median age of 21. Fifty-nine percent of ill people are female. Twenty (38%) people reported being hospitalized. There have been no reports of hemolytic uremic syndrome and no deaths.

CDC is investigating another, more recent outbreak of a different, rare DNA fingerprint of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O26 linked to Chipotle Mexican Grill. Because it is not known if these infections are related to the larger, previously reported outbreak of E. coli O26 infections, these illnesses are not being included in the case count for that outbreak. This investigation is ongoing.

5 ill people have been identified in Kansas (1), North Dakota (1), and Oklahoma (3).

The illnesses started on dates ranging from November 18, 2015 to November 26, 2015.

All five (100%) reported eating at a Chipotle Mexican Grill in the week before illness started.

Costco’s Washington, Montana, California, Utah, Colorado, Missouri and Virginia E. coli Outbreak Appears Over

big-map-11-24-2015The ongoing investigation is working to identify which specific ingredient in the chicken salad is linked to illness.

On November 24, 2015 the Montana Public Health Laboratory reported that it tested a sample of celery and onion diced blend produced by Taylor Farms Pacific, Inc. that was collected from a Costco store in Montana and preliminary results indicated the presence of E. coli O157:H7. As a result of the preliminary laboratory results, Taylor Farms Pacific, Inc., voluntarily recalled multiple products containing celery because they may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 on November 26, 2015.

However, on December 7, 2015, according to the FDA, further laboratory analysis was unable to confirm the presence of E. coli O157:H7 in a sample of celery and onion diced blend produced by Taylor Farms Pacific, Inc. that was collected from a Costco store in Montana.

As of December 8, 2015, 19 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 7 states. No additional illnesses linked to this outbreak have been reported to CDC since November 23. 5 ill people have been hospitalized, and 2 have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported. The epidemiologic evidence available at this time suggests that rotisserie chicken salad made and sold in Costco Wholesale stores in several states is a likely source of this outbreak. 14 (88%) of 16 people purchased or ate rotisserie chicken salad from Costco in the week before illness started.

Chipotle E. coli Outbreak: California (3), Illinois (1), Maryland (1), Minnesota (2), New York (1), Ohio (3), Oregon (13), Pennsylvania (1), and Washington (27)

Since the last update on November 20th when the CDC reported 45 sickened in 6 states – California (2), Minnesota (2), New York (1), Ohio (1), Oregon (13), and Washington (26), seven more ill people have now been reported from California (1), Illinois (1), Maryland (1), Ohio (2), Pennsylvania (1), and Washington (1) adding Illinois, Pennsylvania and Maryland to the mix.

Fifty-two people are now infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O26 from 9 states. The majority of illnesses have been reported from Washington and Oregon during October 2015. The number of ill people reported from each state is as follows: California (3), Illinois (1), Maryland (1), Minnesota (2), New York (1), Ohio (3), Oregon (13), Pennsylvania (1), and Washington (27).

Among people for whom information is available, illnesses started on dates ranging from October 19, 2015 to November 13, 2015. Ill people range in age from 1 year to 94, with a median age of 21. Fifty-nine percent of ill people are female. Twenty (38%) people reported being hospitalized. There have been no reports of hemolytic uremic syndrome and no deaths.

According to the CDC, illnesses that occurred after November 11, 2015 might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported.