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Approximately 214 recruits at both MCRD San Diego and the command’s field training facilities at Edson Range, Camp Pendleton, Calif., are symptomatic of E.Coli exposure with diarrheal illness as of Nov. 1. Of the 214 recruits undergoing treatment, 26 are new cases among the more than 5500 recruits in training. Twelve recruits are admitted to an off-base medical facility while the remainder are being cared for aboard the base.

“The command’s full effort is focused on caring for those recruits who are affected, ensuring we limit any spread of the illness, and identifying the source of the infection,” said Brig. Gen. William Jurney, commanding general, MCRD San Diego and the Western Recruiting Region.

The below updated actions highlight current efforts in addition to what has been previously released:

– Samples and specimens have been forwarded for testing to the US Army Public Health Command located aboard Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX, where they will be tested and processed by the Food Analysis and Diagnostic Lab to determine the cause of the illness.

– Preventative Medicine Units at Naval Medical Center San Diego and Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton continue to inspect all messing facilities for cleanliness, food storage, and handling procedures.

– Food menu alterations have been adopted for infected personnel to better facilitate maintaining diet and recovery.

Family members will be contacted by the command if a recruit is hospitalized or his graduation date changes due to missed training resulting from sickness. Every effort will be made to allow recruits to complete missed training with their original training unit in order to remain on track for their planned graduation date.

Troy Neumann of WKBT reports several recent cases of E. coli are concerning some residents of the La Crosse area.

The La Crosse County Health Department is currently investigating eight reported cases of E. coli in the county. The strain found in our area is known to cause diarrhea, potentially hospitalizing young children.

The Health Department says good hygiene is one of the best and easiest things you can do to prevent an E. coli infection.

“Good hand washing after using the bathroom, good hand washing after changing diapers, good hand washing before preparing food, and good hand washing after coming in from outside are all those hand hygiene things that we would recommend that people do,” said La Crosse County Health Department Health Education Manager Paula Silha.

The La Crosse County Health Department is still investigating eight reports of E. coli in the La Crosse area.

According to Food Safety News, the E. coli outbreak in southwest Utah that has already killed two is growing, and public health officials there have warned people to avoid consuming raw milk or recently purchased ground beef.

Officials with the Southwest Utah Public Health Department initially reported six victims in a July 3 health alert. As of Tuesday, 11 victims had been confirmed. The first victim was a 3-year-old boy who died in June. He and the other fatality, a 6-year-old girl, were not related but they lived in the same apartment building in Hildale.

The source of the outbreak in Hildale, UT, remains under investigation, according to health department spokesman David Heaton who is quoted in local media reports.

Heaton told the Salt Lake Tribune newspaper on Tuesday that the public alert about raw milk and “recently purchased ground beef” is a standard warning and that there is not a confirmed link to such products. He also told the newspaper there could be multiple sources for the E. coli, or the original patient could have contaminated food or surfaces, resulting in additional people becoming infected.

E-COLI-300x200There are now 30 cases of E. coli O121 under investigation.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has added more brands to its recall list of flour and flour based products, over further fears of E. coli contamination.

“It is not safe to taste or eat raw dough or batter regardless of the type of flour used, as raw flour can be contaminated with harmful bacteria such as E. coli O121,” wrote the CFIA in a news release.

The latest recall includes durum atta flour, a flour used to make South Asian flatbreads, and sooji flour, which is used in Indian and Pakistani desserts.

Also added to the list are bread flours, including whole wheat and multigrain bread flours.

Although the bacteria may not cause contaminated food to look or smell spoiled, the CFIA says it can still make you sick.

Possible symptoms include nausea, vomiting, mild to severe abdominal cramps, and watery to bloody diarrhea.

The flour recall has been ongoing since April.

Ardent Mills has issued a recall on the following products:

– Creative Baker, all purpose flour, 10 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 285 SK and 2017 OC 11; 6 286 SK,and 2017 OC 12; 6 312 SK and 2017 NO 07; 6 313 SK and 2017 NO 08.

– Creative Baker, all purpose flour, 20 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 293 SK and 2017 OC 19; 6 309 SK and 2017 NO 04.

– Creative Baker, whole wheat flour, 20 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 280 SK and 2017 AL 06; 6 307 SK and 2017 MA 02; 6 308 SK and 2017 MA 03; 6 28622 10131 0

– Brodie, self raising cake & pastry flour, 1 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 313 548 and 2018 FB 08; 6 314 548 and 2018 FB 09.

– Brodie, self raising cake & pastry flour, 2.5 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 294 548 and 2018 JA 20; 6 294 548 and 2018 JA 21.

– Golden Temple, No. 1 fine durum atta flour blend, 9 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 286 548 and 2018 JA 12; 6 287 548 and 2018 JA 13; 6 299 548 and 2018 JA 25; 6 300 548 and 2018 JA 26.

– Golden Temple, durum atta flour blend, 9 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 286 548 and 2018 JA 12; 6 287 548 and 2018 JA 13; 6 299 548 and 2018 JA 25; 6 300 548 and 2018 JA 26.

– Golden Temple, atta wheat flour, 9 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 279 548 and 2018 JA 05; 6 280 548 and 2018 JA 06; 6 292 548 and 2018 JA; 18 6 293 548 and 2018 JA 19.

– Golden Temple, sooji creamy wheat, 2 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 293 548 and 2018 JA 19; 6 312 548 and 2018 FE 07; 6 313 548 and 2018 FE 08.

– Purity, wheatlets, 550 g: Lot codes containing: 6 317 548 and 2018 FE 12; 6 318 548 and 2018 FE 13.

– Robin Hood, all purpose flour, original, 1 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 312 548 and 2018 MA 07; 6 313 548 and 2018 MA 08.

– Robin Hood, all purpose flour, original, 2.5 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 278 548 and 2018 AL 04; 6 279 548 and 2018 AL 05; 6 280 548 and 2018 AL 06; 6 296 548 and 2018 AL 22; 6 297 548 and 2018 AL 23; 6 298 548 and 2018 AL 24; 6 310 548 and 2018 MA 05; 6 311 548 and 2018 MA 06 6 319 548 and 2018 MA 14.

– Robin Hood, all purpose flour, original, 5 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 305 548 and 2018 AL 30; 6 306 548 and 2018 MA 01; 6 317 548 and 2018 MA 12; 6 318 548 and 2018 MA 13.

– Robin Hood, all purpose flour, original, 10 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 292 548 and 2018 AL 18; 6 295 548 and 2018 AL 21; 6 298 548 and 2018 AL 24; 6 301 548 and 2018 AL 27; 6 305 548 and 2018 AL 30; 6 306 548 and 2018 MA 01; 6 308 548 and 2018 MA 03; 6 309 548 and 2018 MA 04; 6 312 548 and 2018 MA 07; 6 313 548 and 2018 MA 08; 6 314 548 and 2018 MA 09; 6 319 548 and 2018 MA 14.

– Robin Hood, all purpose flour, unbleached, 2.5 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 297 548 and 2018 AL 23; 6 298 548 and 2018 AL 24; 6 308 548 and 2018 MA 03; 6 309 548 and 2018 MA 04.

– Robin Hood, all purpose flour, unbleached, 5 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 302 548 and 2018 AL 28; 6 303 548 and 2018 AL 29; 6 304 548 and 2018 AL 30; 6 317 548 and 2018 MA 12.

– Robin Hood, all purpose flour, whole wheat, 2.5 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 285 548 and 2018 JA 11; 6 286 548 and 2018 JA 12; 6 295 548 and 2018 JA 21; 6 296 548 and 2018 JA 22; 6 309 548 and 2018 FE 04; 6 310 548 and 2018 FE 05.

– Robin Hood, best for bread flour homestyle, white, 5 kg: Lot codes containing: 6 303 548 and 2018 AL 29; 6 314 548 and 2018 MA 09; 6 316 548 and 2018 MA 11; 6 317 548 and 2018 MA 12.

The Boston Globe reported last night reported that an E. coli O157: H7 outbreak had shuttered three locations of the Chicken & Rice Guys, as well as its fleet of Middle Eastern food trucks, Boston health inspectors said Tuesday.

Today, that number jumped to 15 with at least 10 people hospitalized.

The department confirmed 15 cases of E. coli O157: H7 stemming from the Chicken & Rice Guys Allston location, which supplies food to the chain’s other outposts. The problems led to the suspension of its operating license.

The company’s four food trucks, which rotate locations around Greater Boston, were taken off the road Tuesday afternoon.

According to Boston Inspectional Services, the city received an anonymous complaint and opened an investigation Tuesday. Public health officials remained at the Allston site throughout the afternoon trying to determine a specific source of the outbreak.

Twenty-nine people infected with the outbreak strains of STEC O157:H7 have been reported from 12 states. Arizona 4, California 5, Florida 1, Illinois 1, Massachusetts 1, Maryland 1, Missouri 1, New Jersey 1, Oregon 9, Virginia, 2, Washington 2, and Wisconsin 1.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 4, 2017, to March 13, 2017. Ill people range in age from 1 to 57 years, with a median age of 8. Twenty-four (83%) of the 29 ill people are younger than 18 years. Among ill people, 59% are male. Twelve ill people have been hospitalized, and nine people developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

Laboratory testing found the outbreak strains of STEC O157:H7 in I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter collected from the homes of ill people and from retail locations.

soynut-butter-productOn March 7, 2017, The SoyNut Butter Company recalled all varieties of I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butters and all varieties of I.M. Healthy Granola products. On March 10, 2017, The SoyNut Butter Company expanded its recall to include Dixie Diner’s Club brand Carb Not Beanit Butter. On March 23, 20/20 Lifestyle Yogurt Peanut Crunch Bars were recalled because they contain a recalled ingredient.

CDC recommends that consumers do not eat, and childcare centers, schools, and other institutions do not serve, any variety or size of I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter, I.M. Healthy brand granola, Dixie Diner’s Club brand Carb Not Beanit Butter, or 20/20 Lifestyle Yogurt Peanut Crunch Bars, regardless of the date of purchase or the date listed on the container. Even if some of the product was eaten or served and no one got sick, throw the rest of it away. Put it in a sealed bag in the trash so that children, pets, or other animals can’t eat it.

The CDC this morning updated the E. coli O157:H7 outbreak linked to I.M. Healthy and Dixie Dew Soy Nut Butter to twenty-three people infected with the outbreak strains of E. coli O157:H7 from nine states. Arizona 4, California 5, Maryland 1, Missouri 1, New Jersey 1, Oregon 6, Virginia 2, Washington 2, Wisconsin 1.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 4, 2017, to March 5, 2017. Ill people range in age from 1 to 48 years, with a median age of 8. Twenty (87%) of the 23 ill people are younger than 18 years. Among ill people, 61% are male. Ten ill people have been hospitalized and seven people developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported. Illnesses that occurred after February 24, 2017, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported.

In interviews, ill people or their family members answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Twenty (87%) of the 23 people reached for interview reported either eating I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter at home (14 people) in the week before they became ill, attending a facility that served I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter (2 people), or attending childcare centers that served I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter and I.M. Healthy brand granola coated with SoyNut Butter (4 people). SoyNut Butter is a nut-free substitute for peanut butter. Investigators have reported to CDC two more ill people who either developed HUS or had test showing they were infected with the E. coli O157:H7 bacteria.

Laboratory testing identified E. coli O157:H7 in opened containers of I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter collected from the homes of ill people in California, Oregon, and Washington. Officials in California also isolated E. coli O157:H7 in unopened containers of I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter collected from retail locations. Further testing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that the E. coli O157:H7 in all of these containers of SoyNut Butter had the same DNA fingerprints as the E. coli O157:H7 isolates from ill people.

CDC, multiple states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coliO157:H7 (STEC O157:H7) infections.

Sixteen people infected with the outbreak strains of STEC O157:H7 have been reported from nine states.

Eight ill people have been hospitalized. Five people developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure, and no deaths have been reported.

Fourteen of the 16 ill people in this outbreak are younger than 18 years old.

Epidemiologic evidence indicates that I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter is a likely source of this outbreak. I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and could make people sick.

On March 7, 2017, The SoyNut Butter Company recalled all varieties of I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butters and all varieties of I.M. Healthy Granola products.

CDC recommends that consumers do not eat, and childcare centers, schools, and other institutions do not serve, any variety or size of I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter, or I.M. Healthy granola coated with SoyNut Butter, regardless of the date of purchase or the date listed on the container.

Even if some of the SoyNut Butter or granola was eaten or served and no one got sick, throw the rest of the product away. Put it in a sealed bag in the trash so that children, pets, or other animals can’t eat it.

The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is warning consumers not to eat “I.M. Healthy” brand soy nut butter and soy nut butter-containing products from “The SoyNut Butter Company” until further notice because of possible contamination with E. coli O157 bacteria.  This strain of E. coli can cause disease by making a toxin called Shiga toxin. These bacteria are referred to as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, or STEC.

Health and Mental Hygiene is working with other states, CDC, and the FDA to investigate a multistate cluster of E. coli O157 infections.  These infections are closely related genetically, indicating a likely common source, such as food.  The investigation is ongoing, however, the Maryland patient consumed “I. M. Healthy” soy nut butter prior to becoming ill and cases in other states might also be associated with this product.

Some types of STEC frequently cause severe disease, including bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which is a type of kidney failure. Sometimes infection causes non-bloody diarrhea or no symptoms. Symptoms typically begin within 3 to 4 days, but can range from 1 to 10 days, after exposure. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a serious complication that occurs in some infected people, particularly children under 5 and the elderly. In this syndrome, red blood cells are destroyed and kidney failure occurs.  Anyone suspecting STEC infection should contact their healthcare provider.

The I.M. Healthy soy nut butter and soy nut butter-containing products have been distributed to a range of stores in Maryland and are also available for purchase online. Due to their long shelf life, consumers should check for these products and not eat these products until further notice.

Eleven people infected with the outbreak strain of STEC O157:H7 were reported from five states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 27, 2016 to September 10, 2016. Ill people ranged in age from 1 year to 74, with a median age of 32. Forty-five percent of ill people were female. Seven ill people were hospitalized. One ill person developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure, and no deaths were reported.

Epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory evidence indicated that beef products produced by Adams Farm Slaughterhouse in Athol, Massachusetts, were the likely source of this outbreak.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Seven (100%) of the seven people reached for interview reported eating ground beef in the week before they became ill. Traceback information indicated that six (86%) of these seven ill people ate ground beef produced by Adams Farm Slaughterhouse.

The Connecticut Department of Public Health collected leftover Adams Farm Slaughterhouse ground beef from an ill person’s home and from a restaurant for testing. Test results showed the outbreak strain of STEC O157:H7 in both samples of leftover ground beef.

On September 24, 2016, Adams Farm Slaughterhouse recalled various cuts of beef, veal, and bison products due to possible E. coli O157:H7 contamination. The products originated from animals slaughtered on July 15, 25, and 27, 2016 and August 3, 8, 10, 11, 17, 24, and 26, 2016, and further processed and packed on various dates between July 21 and September 22, 2016. These items were shipped to farmers’ markets, retail locations, and restaurants in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and eastern New York. The products may have been shipped to neighboring states. The products subject to recall have establishment number EST. 5497 inside the USDA mark of inspection and include several lot numbers and cuts of meat. The full list can be found on the USDA-FSIS website.

This outbreak appears to be over. However, the recalled beef, veal, and bison products may still be in freezers. Consumers who don’t know about the outbreak could continue to eat recalled products and get sick.