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St. John Creamery in Monroe announced on Thursday it is voluntarily recalling raw goat milk that may be contaminated with Escherichia coli (E.coli) bacteria.

A June 14 news release states the recall was initiated after “the presence of toxin-producing E.coli in retail raw goal milk dated 6/17” was discovered during routine sampling by the Washington State Department of Agriculture.

Included in the recall are half-gallon and one-pint containers of raw goat milk marked best by June 17-21.

Symptoms of E. coli infections include severe diarrhea, stomach cramps, bloody stool and, in some cases, hemolytic uremic syndrome.

“Anyone experiencing these symptoms should immediately contact a health care provider,” the new release states. “At this time, there are no known illnesses associated with the recalled product.”

Consumers are being asked to return their purchases for a full refund. These raw milk products were sold at various Western Washington retail stores, at the farm store (28408 Fern Bluff Road) and directly to customers via drop groups.

As of April 12, 2018, 35 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 11 states. Connecticut 2, Idaho 8, Illinois 1, Michigan 1, Missouri 1, New Jersey 7, New York 2, Ohio 2, Pennsylvania 9, Virginia 1 and Washington 1.  (CDC Report)

Illnesses started on dates ranging from March 22, 2018 to March 31, 2018. Ill people range in age from 12 to 84 years, with a median age of 29. Sixty-nine percent of ill people are female. Twenty-two ill people have been hospitalized, including three people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

The current outbreak is not related to a recent multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections linked to leafy greens. People in the previous outbreak were infected with a different DNA fingerprint of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria.

Epidemiologic evidence collected to date indicates that chopped romaine lettuce is the likely source of this outbreak. Most people reported eating a salad at a restaurant, and romaine lettuce was the only common ingredient identified among the salads eaten. The restaurants reported using bagged, chopped romaine lettuce to make salads.

Traceback investigations are ongoing to determine the source of chopped romaine lettuce supplied to restaurant locations where ill people ate. At this time, no common grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been identified. However, preliminary information indicates that the chopped romaine lettuce was from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. Information collected to date indicates that chopped romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region could be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and could make people sick.

An unrevealed quantity of ground beef packaged for meal-kit provider GoodFood and distributed directly to consumers in at least five Canadian provinces is under recall after government tests showed E. coli contamination.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) posted the recall notice late Sunday, urging consumers to check their homes for the Good Boucher branded ground beef. The agency found the deadly E. coli O157:H7 species when it tested samples of the beef.

“Check to see if you have the products in your home. If the products are in your home, do not consume them,” according to the CFIA recall notice. “Food contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick.”

No illnesses had been confirmed in connection to the recalled ground beef as of Sunday. The implicated beef, packaged for GoodFood, could have been distributed nationwide in Canada, according to the recall notice. It was definitely distributed in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island and Quebec.

Additional products could be recalled if the CFIA finds that they include the ground beef from Good Boucher. The recalled ground beef can be identified by looking for the following label information:


Brand Name         Common Name       Size       Code(s) on Product         UPC
Good Boucher Lean Ground Beef 285 g Lot: 18-03-07
Best before: 2018-03-21
None
Good Boucher Lean Ground Beef 510 g Lot: 18-03-05
Best before: 2018-03-19
None
Good Boucher Lean Ground Beef 510 g Lot: 18-03-07
Best before: 2018-03-21
None

Anyone who has eaten any of the recalled ground beef and developed symptoms of E. coli poisoning should immediately seek medical attention and tell their doctors about the possible exposure to the pathogen. Specific lab tests but be conducted to diagnose food poisoning.

Symptoms of E. coli infection can include nausea, vomiting, mild to severe abdominal cramps and watery to bloody diarrhea. In severe cases of illness, some people may have seizures or strokes, need blood transfusions and kidney dialysis or live with permanent kidney damage. The infection and complications are sometimes fatal.

High risk groups for severe illness and complications include young children, older and/or frail adults, pregnant women and people with suppressed immune systems such as diabetics, HIV patients, transplant recipients and cancer patients.

BrightFarms is initiating a voluntary recall of packaged produce sold in Roundy’s Supermarkets due to the potential presence of E. coli at its Rochelle, Illinois (Ogle County) greenhouse farm.

The affected BrightFarms branded products are sold at Mariano’s Markets in Illinois and Metro Market and Pick ‘n Save stores in Wisconsin.

The recall includes the below salad products packaged in clear, plastic clamshells with best by dates located on the label of the package: 10/24/2017, 10/25/2017, 10/26/2017, 10/27/2017.

  • BrightFarms Baby Spinach (4 oz. and 8 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Spring Mix (4 oz. and 8 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Spinach Blend (4 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Baby Greens Blend (4 oz. and 8 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Baby Kale (3 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Baby Arugula (4 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Baby Romaine Mix (4 oz. package)

Basil products, packaged in clear plastic clamshells with best by dates located on the label of the package: 10/24/2017, 10/25/2017, 10/26/2017, 10/27/2017.

  • BrightFarms Basil (.75 oz. and 2 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Thai Basil (.75 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Lemon Basil (.75 oz. package)

Screen Shot 2017-05-04 at 5.36.09 PMMarcho Farms, Inc., a Souderton, Pa. establishment, is recalling approximately 5,620 pounds of boneless veal, and ground veal, beef and pork products that may be adulterated withnon-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O111, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The veal, beef and pork products were produced on April 11 and April 14, 2017. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF Only)]

  • 60-lb.cases of “VEAL BONELESS TRIMMINGS HALAL” with case code “5398” and “MANFU. DATE” of “04/11/2017.”
  • 60-lb. cases of “VEAL TRIMMINGS USDA CHOICE” with case code “98” and “MANFU. DATE” of “04/11/17.”
  • 9-lb. cases of “VEAL, BEEF, PORK GROUND FOR MEATLOAF” with case code “3122” and “Sell By” date “05/05/17.”
  • 10-lb. cases of “VEAL, BEEF, PORK GROUND FOR MEATLOAF BULK PACK” with case code “3125.”

These items were distributed to retail stores and food service locations in Illinois, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Virginia.

The problem was discovered when the Illinois State Meat Inspection Service notified FSIS on May 2, 2017, about positive non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) samples made with source material produced by Marcho Farms, Inc. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) outbreaks are rare, but tend to primarily be due to contaminated food and person-to-person transmission. Like E. coli O157:H7, non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2–8 days (3–4 days, on average) after exposure the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5-years old and older adults. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

H & B Packing Co., Inc., a Waco, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 73,742 pounds of boneless beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O103, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The boneless beef items were produced on March 6, 2017. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 60-lb. box containing boneless beef with case code 69029 and production date 03/06/17.
  • Multiple combo bins containing 73,682-lbs of boneless beef with case code 69029 and production date 03/06/17.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. M13054” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to food manufacturers within the state of Texas.

The problem was discovered when FSIS was notified by the State of Texas’ Meat Safety Assurance Unit about a positive non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli sample.

There have been no confirmed reports of illnesses due to consumption of these products.

Many clinical laboratories do not test for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), such as STEC O103 because it is harder to identify than STEC O157. People can become ill from STECs 2–8 days (average of 3–4 days) after consuming the organism. Most people infected with STEC O103 develop diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. Some illnesses last longer and can be more severe. Infection is usually diagnosed by testing of a stool sample. Vigorous rehydration and other supportive care is the usual treatment; antibiotic treatment is generally not recommended.

Most people recover within a week, but, rarely, some develop a more severe infection. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is uncommon with STEC O103 infection. HUS can occur in people of any age but is most common in children under 5 years old, older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in customers’ freezers.

Customers who have purchased these products are urged not to use them.

Gold Medal Packing Inc., a Rome, N.Y. establishment, is recalling approximately 4,607 pounds of boneless veal products that may be contaminated with E. coli O26 and O45, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.Screen Shot 2016-12-23 at 4.01.50 PMThe veal trim and top bottom sirloin (TBS) products were produced and packaged on August 16, 2016, and October 25, 2016. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 60-lb. boxes containing “BONELESS VEAL”.
  • 2,387-lb. bin containing “TBS”.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 17965” inside the USDA mark of inspection. The “BONELESS VEAL” items were shipped to a warehouse in California and the “TBS” items were shipped to distributor locations in Pennsylvania.

The problem was discovered during routine sample testing. There have been no confirmed reports of illness or adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

Many clinical laboratories do not test for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), such as STEC O26 or O45, because they are harder to identify than STEC O157. People can become ill from STECs 2–8 days (average of 3–4 days) after consuming the organism. Most people infected with STEC O26 or O45 develop diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. Some illnesses last longer and can be more severe. Infection is usually diagnosed by testing of a stool sample. Vigorous rehydration and other supportive care is the usual treatment; antibiotic treatment is generally not recommended.

Most people recover within a week, but, rarely, some develop a more severe infection. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is uncommon with STEC O26 or STEC O45 infections. HUS can occur in people of any age but is most common in children under 5 year’s old, older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

Silver Springs Farms, Inc., a Harleysville, Pa. establishment is recalling approximately 7,970 pounds of ground beef and burger products, as well as an undetermined amount of sandwich steak products that may be adulterated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ground beef items were produced on August 19 and 20, 2016. The exact production dates for the various sandwich steak products are unknown at this time, but are believed to have been produced between August 19 and September 19, 2016. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF only)]

  • 20-lb. cases containing 4 packages of 5-lb ground beef 80/20.
  • 10-lb. packages of “Camellia Beef Pattie 80/20,” with package codes 6235 and 6242.
  • 10-lb. packages of “Silver Springs Farm Beef Pattie 80/20,” with package codes 6242 and 6237.
  • 10-lb. packages of “Silver Springs Farm Beef Pattie 80/20 Flat,” with package code 6237.
  • 10-lb. packages of “Silver Springs Farm Gourmet Beef Burger Flat,” with package code 6235.
  • 10-lb. packages of “Silver Springs Farm Gourmet Beef Burger 80/20,” with package code 6237.
  • 10-lb. packages of “Silver Springs Farm Gourmet Beef Pattie 80/20,” with package code 6242.
  • various sandwich steak products produced by the recalling firm.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 4771” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to a distributor in Virginia and institutional food establishments in New York, Pennsylvania and Maryland.

The problem was discovered during a routine verification sampling performed by Silver Springs Farms, Inc. There have been no confirmed reports of illness or adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2–8 days (3–4 days, on average) after exposure the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5-years old and older adults. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

All American Meats, Inc., an Omaha, Neb. establishment, is recalling approximately 167,427 pounds of ground beef products that may be adulterated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ground beef items were produced on Oct. 16, 2015. The following products are subject to recall:

80-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef 80% Lean 20% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 62100.
80-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef 73% Lean 27% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 60100.
60-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef Round 85% Lean 15% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 68560.
60-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef Chuck 81% Lean 19% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 68160.
60-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef Chuck 81% Lean 19% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 63130.
80-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef Chuck 81% Lean 19% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 63100.
The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 20420” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered on Oct. 30, 2015, when a positive result for E. coli O157:H7 from FSIS’ in-commerce surveillance program testing was traced back to the establishment. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2–8 days (3–4 days, on average) after exposure to the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5-years old and older adults. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development today issued a consumer advisory for Uncle John’s Old Fashioned Apple Cider produced by Uncle John’s Cider Mill located at 8614 US-127 in St. Johns, MI, because it has the potential to be contaminated with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli bacteria. Consumers who have purchased this product at Uncle John’s Cider Mill are urged not to consume it and dispose of the product immediately.

A routine, random sample collected by an MDARD food inspector tested positive for the Shiga-toxin producing E. coli by the department’s Geagley Laboratory. No illnesses have been reported to date. Uncle John’s has voluntarily ceased sales of cider awaiting further test results.

This advisory affects approximately 1,200 gallons of cider produced on October 17. The cider was sold at the cider mill from the retail cooler, packaged in various sized plastic jugs with a sell by date of October 30, 2015; or served directly to consumers by the cup as cold cider, frozen cider slushes and hot cider, from October 18 through October 21.

The E. coli symptoms  vary by individual, but often include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. If there is fever, it usually is not very high (less than 101˚F/less than 38.5˚C). Most people get better within 5–7 days. Some infections are very mild, but others are severe or even life-threatening. Around 5–10% of those diagnosed with Shiga-toxin producing E.coli infections develop a potentially life-threatening complication known as hemolytic uremic syndrome. Signs that a person is developing HUS include decreased frequency of urination, feeling very tired, and losing pink color in cheeks and inside the lower eyelids. Persons with HUS should be hospitalized because their kidneys may stop working and they may develop other serious problems. Most persons with HUS recover within a few weeks, but some suffer permanent damage or die. People experiencing these problems should seek immediate medical attention.