“Chicken Salad made with Rotisserie Chicken” from Costco has been connected with at least one case of E. coli O157:H7 in Washington. Consumers who purchased this product – item number 37719 – from any Washington Costco location should discard it.

The Department of Health, along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other western states, are investigating E. coli illnesses from chicken salad purchased from various Costco stores in late October. Washington has confirmed one case of E. coli O157:H7 from King County, who became ill in late October. This confirmed case was not hospitalized.

“We take E. coli very seriously in Washington,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Scott Lindquist, “and we are working with CDC and state partners to determine the source.”

Others states with confirmed E. coli cased linked to Costco chicken salad include Colorado, Montana, and Utah. In addition to CDC, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and U.S. Department of Agriculture are working with Costco to determine the source of the contamination.

People who have eaten this product and feel ill should consult with their health care provider. If you have leftover product in your refrigerator or freezer do not eat it and discard the product. People usually get sick 2-8 days after getting E. coli. Only people who have symptoms should see a health care provider.

Most people infected with E. coli develop diarrhea – often bloody – and abdominal cramps. Most people recover within a week. Some illnesses last longer and can be more severe, resulting in a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).  HUS can occur in people of any age, but is most common in young children under five, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems. Symptoms of HUS can include fever, abdominal pain, pale skin tone, fatigue and irritability, small, unexplained bruises or bleeding from the nose and mouth, and decreased urination. People who have these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately. Antibiotics and antidiarrheal medicines should not be given unless E. coli is ruled out, since they may increase the risk of HUS in people with E. coli infections.

An E. coli 0157:H7 outbreak that sickened nearly two dozen people and prompted a popular south-Reno restaurant to voluntarily close has been linked to a dessert food manufactured, sold, and distributed by Reno Provisions according to Health District officials.

“Our epidemiologists and environmental health staff have identified a dessert that was prepared by Reno Provisions,” said Washoe County District Health Officer Kevin Dick. “Several people who ate at the Twisted Fork restaurant had the dessert, as did some other people outside the Reno area who then developed the E. coli infection. That commonality led investigators to the dessert supplier, and to tests of food and equipment at Reno Provisions,” Dick added.

Now that positive test results have identified a specific E. coli source, the Health District’s investigation has shifted focus from the restaurant to the manufacturer. The Health District confirms that all of the remaining desserts associated with the E. coli contaminations have been disposed of.

Since mid-October twenty-one confirmed and probable cases of E. coli 0157:H7 have been reported in Washoe County.  “The complete cooperation and engagement in the investigation that we received from Twisted Fork, and their decision to voluntarily close, were significant factors in identifying the E. coli source,” said Dick.

Forty-five people infected with the outbreak strain of STEC O26 have been reported from 6 states. The majority of illnesses have been reported from Washington and Oregon. The number of ill people reported from each state is as follows: California (2), Minnesota (2), New York (1), Ohio (1), Oregon (13), and Washington (26).

Among people for whom information is available, illnesses started on dates ranging from October 19, 2015 to November 8, 2015. Ill people range in age from 2 years to 94, with a median age of 22. Fifty-eight percent of ill people are female. Sixteen (36%) people reported being hospitalized. There have been no reports of hemolytic uremic syndrome and no deaths.

The epidemiologic evidence available to investigators at this time suggests that a meal item or ingredient served at Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurants at several states is a likely source of this outbreak. The investigation has not identified what specific food is linked to illness. Chipotle Mexican Grill is assisting public health officials with understanding the distribution of food items served at locations where ill people ate and this work is ongoing.

State and local public health officials are interviewing ill people to obtain information about foods they might have eaten and other exposures in the week before their illness started. Forty-three (96%) of 45 people interviewed reported eating at a Chipotle Mexican Grill restaurant. The investigation is ongoing to identify common meal items or ingredients causing illness.

On November 12, the CDC reported fifty ill people from Washington (31) and Oregon (19) from Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O26 (STEC O26) infections. Fourteen people have been hospitalized in Washington (10) and Oregon (4) linked to Chipotle restaurants in Oregon and Washington.

Today the CDC reported that Public health officials in Washington, Oregon, and Minnesota announced that that are continuing the investigation of an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O26 (STEC O26) infections. CDC and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are assisting with the investigation. As of November 17, 2015, 37 people infected with the outbreak strain of STEC O26 have been reported to CDC PulseNet from Washington (24) and Oregon (13). 13 of these people were hospitalized in Washington (9) and Oregon (4). Additional illnesses are under investigation by Washington and Oregon and will be reported if they are confirmed to be infected with the outbreak strain of STEC O26.

There have been no reported infections with the outbreak strain of STEC O26 in Washington or Oregon since the Chipotle Mexican Grill locations closed in the Pacific Northwest on October 30, 2015. A search of the PulseNet database identified one person in Minnesota infected with STEC O26 that has the same DNA fingerprint as ill people in Washington and Oregon. This ill person did not eat at a Chipotle Mexican Grill in the week before illness onset. Minnesota’s investigation is ongoing. The illness does not appear to be linked to Chipotle Mexican Grill locations in Washington and Oregon.

Washington and Oregon report that nearly all of the ill people ate at several locations of Chipotle Mexican Grill in those states before getting sick. The investigation is still ongoing to determine if the ill people ate a meal item or ingredient in common that was served at the Chipotle Mexican Grill locations. Chipotle Mexican Grill reopened its restaurants in Washington and in the Portland, Oregon area that had been closed in response to this investigation.

Fifty ill people have been reported from Washington (31) and Oregon (19). Fourteen people have been hospitalized in Washington (10) and Oregon (4). There have been no reports of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and no deaths.

Thirty-three isolates from ill people in Washington (22) and Oregon (11) have been uploaded to the CDC PulseNet database. All 33 people were infected with STEC O26 that has the same DNA fingerprint. Additionally, as reported on November 6, a search of the PulseNet database identified one person in Minnesota infected with STEC O26 that has the same DNA fingerprint. This ill person did not eat at a Chipotle Mexican Grill in the week before illness onset. Minnesota’s investigation is ongoing. The illness does not appear to be related to the outbreak in Washington and Oregon linked to Chipotle Mexican Grill locations in those states. Whole genome sequencing, an advanced laboratory technique, is being used to give investigators more information about the DNA fingerprint of the pathogen causing illnesses in Washington, Oregon, and Minnesota.

CDC and state and local public health partners are continuing laboratory surveillance through PulseNet to identify additional ill persons and to interview them. Updates will be provided when more information is available.

The investigation is still ongoing to determine if the ill people ate a meal item or ingredient in common that was served at the Chipotle Mexican Grill locations. Several food items collected from Chipotle Mexican Grill locations in Washington and Oregon are being tested by FDA and Chipotle for the presence of bacteria. As of November 12, 2015, test results have not identified E. coli in any of the food items tested. Additional results are pending and will be reported once available.

The case count in the investigation of an outbreak of E. coli O26 illnesses related to Chipotle restaurants in Washington and Oregon includes 30 Washington residents and 19 Oregon residents.

Five Chipotle restaurants in Washington are associated with this outbreak: Hazel Dell, 7715 NE 5th Avenue, Suite 109, in Vancouver; 1404 Broadway Avenue and 4229 University Way NE in Seattle; 512 Ramsey Way 101 in Kent; and 1753 S. Burlington Blvd. in Burlington.

In Oregon 19 sick have been reported from Multnomah, Clackamas, Washington, Columbia, Linn and Lane counties. Four people have been hospitalized and they range in age from 11 to 74. Associated Chipotle Restaurants: Cascade Station (9687 NE Cascades Pkwy), Washington Square (9120 SW Hall Blvd), Lake Oswego (8 Centerpointe Dr), Tanasbourne (2048 NW Stucki Ave), Sunnyside (Clackamas Town Center) and Gresham (2065 NE Burnside Rd).

Public health officials in Washington, Oregon, and Minnesota are investigating an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O26 (STEC O26) infections. CDC and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are assisting with the investigation. As of November 6, 2015:

  • 41 ill people have been reported from Washington (28) and Oregon (13).
  • 14 people have been hospitalized in Washington (10) and Oregon (4).
  • There have been no reports of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and no deaths.

Laboratory testing is ongoing to determine the DNA fingerprint of the STEC O26 bacteria making people sick. These DNA fingerprints are uploaded to the CDC PulseNet database as they become available.

16 isolates from ill people in Washington (13) and Oregon (3) have been uploaded to the CDC PulseNet database. All 16 people were infected with STEC O26 that has the same DNA fingerprint. Laboratory testing is continuing.

A search of the PulseNet database identified one person in Minnesota infected with STEC O26 that has the same DNA fingerprint. This ill person did not eat at a Chipotle Mexican Grill in the week before illness onset. Minnesota’s investigation is ongoing. At this time, the illness does not appear to be related to the outbreak in Washington and Oregon.

Washington and Oregon report that most of the ill people ate at several locations of Chipotle Mexican Grill in those states before getting sick.

The investigation is ongoing to determine if the ill people ate a common meal item or ingredient that was served at the Chipotle Mexican Grill locations.

The investigation into an outbreak of E. coli O26 illnesses linked to Chipotle restaurants in Washington and Oregon is up to 29 reported Washington cases. The latest update includes a case in an additional county, Whatcom.

The Washington State Department of Health continues working closely with local, state, and federal partners on a disease investigation to learn the extent of the outbreak and possible sources of E. coli bacteria.

In Washington, residents of Clark (12), Cowlitz (3), Island (2), King (6), Skagit (5), and Whatcom (1) counties have been reported as outbreak cases. Nearly all of the 29 cases reported having been at Chipotle restaurants before getting sick. Eleven of the Washington residents were hospitalized. Cases range in age from 1-to-67.

There are five Washington restaurants associated with this outbreak: Hazel Dell, 7715 NE 5th Avenue, Suite 109, in Vancouver; 1404 Broadway Avenue and 4229 University Way NE in Seattle; 512 Ramsey Way 101 in Kent; and 1753 S. Burlington Blvd. in Burlington.

The Oregon Health Authority is reporting a total of 10 cases of Shiga toxin E. coli O26 linked to eating at Chipotle restaurants in the Portland Metro area, up from three cases that were first reported October 31.

Among the cases, three were hospitalized. People in Multnomah, Clackamas and Washington counties, as well as Columbia, Benton and Deschutes counties have reported symptoms.

Five locations in Oregon are involved, all of them in the Portland metro area: Cascade Station at 9687 N.E. Cascades Parkway; Washington Square at 9120 S.W. Hall Blvd.; Lake Oswego at 8 Centerpointe Dr.; Tanasbourne at 2048 N.W. Stucki Ave., and Sunnyside in the Clackamas Town Center.

The investigation into an outbreak of E. coli O26 illnesses that may be related to Chipotle restaurants in Washington and Oregon has grown from 19 reported Washington cases to 25 as of today. The Washington State Department of Health continues working closely with local, state, and federal partners on a disease investigation to learn the extent of the outbreak and possible sources of E. coli O26 bacteria.

In Washington, residents of Clark (11), Cowlitz (2), Island (2), King (6), and Skagit (4) counties have been reported as outbreak cases. Of the 25 cases, 23 reported having been at Chipotle restaurants before getting sick. Nine of the Washington residents were hospitalized. Cases range in age from five-to-60.  The Washington Department of Health said there are five Washington restaurants associated with this outbreak: Hazel Dell, 7715 NE 5thAvenue, Suite 109, in Vancouver; 1404 Broadway Avenue and 4229 University Way NE in Seattle; 512 Ramsey Way 101 in Kent; and 1753 S. Burlington Blvd. in Burlington.

The Oregon Health Authority is reporting a total of 12 cases of Shiga toxin E. coli O26 linked to eating at Chipotle restaurants in the Portland Metro area, up from three cases that were first reported October 31.

Among the cases, three were hospitalized. There have been no deaths. People in Multnomah, Clackamas and Washington counties, as well as Columbia, Benton and Deschutes counties have reported symptoms.

All American Meats, Inc., an Omaha, Neb. establishment, is recalling approximately 167,427 pounds of ground beef products that may be adulterated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ground beef items were produced on Oct. 16, 2015. The following products are subject to recall:

80-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef 80% Lean 20% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 62100.
80-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef 73% Lean 27% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 60100.
60-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef Round 85% Lean 15% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 68560.
60-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef Chuck 81% Lean 19% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 68160.
60-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef Chuck 81% Lean 19% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 63130.
80-lb. (approximate weight) boxes of “Ground Beef Chuck 81% Lean 19% Fat (Fine Grind)” with Sell By Date 11-03-2015 and case code 63100.
The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 20420” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered on Oct. 30, 2015, when a positive result for E. coli O157:H7 from FSIS’ in-commerce surveillance program testing was traced back to the establishment. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2–8 days (3–4 days, on average) after exposure to the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5-years old and older adults. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.